Recovery Update

Recovery Update features the most recent articles from throughout the field of psychiatric rehabilitation. Stay up to date on all the latest mental health news through this weekly newsletter.
 

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Recovery Update features the most recent articles from throughout the field of psychiatric rehabilitation. Stay up to date on all the latest mental health news through this weekly newsletter.

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For all the attention paid to the short and long-term physical effects of COVID-19, the disease has serious mental health consequences, too. In a new report, Yale researchers examine how the pandemic is affecting our brains — in particular the prefrontal cortex, the part of the brain that is involved in decision making, impulse control, and emotional regulation.
Companies have asked a lot of managers during the last year. Team leaders have been tasked with keeping subordinates motivated and productive in the midst of a global pandemic, all while maintaining a steady presence as the ground has shifted beneath them.
"I got a knock on the door at 2.45 in the morning," says Lee Fryatt. It was the police. His son Daniel, a 19-year-old student at Bath Spa University, had taken his own life. "What you learn once you suffer a loss like suicide is that it's only other people who have experienced it who have got any comprehension of just how devastating it is.
Dr. Alvin Thomas, Clinical Psychologist and Assistant Professor at the UW-Madison School of Human Ecology, speaks to the trauma and the psychological toll on Black people related to repeated news headlines, video, and coverage of the Chauvin trial and ongoing killing of Black persons by police.
The Undergraduate Council endorsed an all-Ivy League statement on mental health and allocated funds toward a project supporting transgender and gender non-conforming students in purchasing gender-affirming clothing at its regular meeting Sunday. The first piece of legislation allows the Council to sign onto an all-Ivy League mental health statement that calls for BIPOC mental health care, active "comp" oversight, increased counseling services, and leave of absence policy reform.
As Sonoma County, California, supervisors prepare to mete out new sales tax revenue approved by voters for mental health and homelessness services, leaders in the county's second-largest city are looking to tap into the new funding source. In Petaluma, city staff have prepared a slate of spending priorities, including a new crisis response team, as well as additional funding for homelessness services and support. Officials say an additional funding stream generated by Measure O, a quarter-cent countywide sales tax, could enhance those efforts.
One man, convicted of killing two court bailiffs in Orange County, suffered from delusions that he was Jesus Christ. Another man with a long history of paranoid schizophrenia murdered eight people in South Florida. He believed he was the prince of God. Both Thomas Provenzano and John Errol Ferguson were sentenced to death.
The Community Foundation of Western North Carolina approved grants of up to $541,300 to aid 17 WNC counties affected by the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a press release. The awards are to provide funding for basic human needs in Latino communities and young mental health services across the region.
When the Centers for Disease Control declared last week that racism is a serious public health threat in America, it acknowledged something that researchers have found for decades: On nearly every measure of health, African Americans are more prone to serious disease and premature death.
People with green space on their doorstep or access to a private garden reported better health and wellbeing during and after the first lockdown in the UK, according to a new study. Researchers from Cardiff University and Cardiff Metropolitan University have shown that people with a garden and a park nearby were more likely to say they were feeling calm, peaceful and had a lot of energy as compared to those with no access to a garden or living further away from a green space.